Call to Congress 2018: Why It’s Important to Be a Diabetes Advocate

c2cmnI never could’ve imagined when I was 16 years old that I would fall in love with advocating for issues I care about in Washington, D.C. That’s when the American Diabetes Association (ADA) gave me a platform, tools, and resources to make a difference. As a young girl from a small Minnesota town, that early experience gave me confidence when I realized the impact of telling the story of my life with type 1 diabetes. All these years later, I’m still attending the ADA’s Call to Congress event on Capitol Hill.

Lots of people ask me if it’s intimidating to speak with elected officials but I don’t find the experience intimidating. The way I look at it, we’re actually their bosses. We elect them to that office. So, when I meet with them I view myself as a concerned constituent and a helpful resource of information for them on the topic of diabetes.

At last week’s event I represented my home state of Minnesota with another passionate advocate who has type 2 diabetes. We also joined forces with South Dakota, so we attended meetings for both states.

Read the rest of my blogpost at On Track Diabetes….

One thought on “Call to Congress 2018: Why It’s Important to Be a Diabetes Advocate

  1. One of the issues that is just plain wrong is we may elect them by voting but big Pharma pays for their tools they need to be elected. If your going to run for office, big office, congress, you need money. There are some folks that are willing to help you, NRA, Big Pharma, etc. That is a big problem. I have been a type 1 diabetic for 54 years, is my congressmen going to help me with my battle? It would help if my last name was Koch!

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