How Becoming an Activist Helped my Mental Health

This past month I had the incredible opportunity in participating in my first protest, as well as an annual diabetes advocacy event called Call to Congress in Washington, D.C. I often say to people that being an activist is one of the best things that I’ve ever done for my mental health. When I kept my secrets of living with type 1 diabetes and/or an eating disorder, it was me that was struggling, not anyone else. This is why I love the quote from Brene Brown that says, “Owning our story can be hard but not nearly as difficult as spending our lives running from it. Embracing our vulnerabilities is risky but not nearly as dangerous as giving up on love and belonging and joy–the experiences that make us the most vulnerable. Only when we are brave enough to explore the darkness will we discover the infinite power of our light.”

Read the rest of my blogpost on Center for Change’s website…

https://centerforchange.com/how-becoming-an-activist-helped-my-mental-health/

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Call to Congress 2018: Why It’s Important to Be a Diabetes Advocate

c2cmnI never could’ve imagined when I was 16 years old that I would fall in love with advocating for issues I care about in Washington, D.C. That’s when the American Diabetes Association (ADA) gave me a platform, tools, and resources to make a difference. As a young girl from a small Minnesota town, that early experience gave me confidence when I realized the impact of telling the story of my life with type 1 diabetes. All these years later, I’m still attending the ADA’s Call to Congress event on Capitol Hill.

Lots of people ask me if it’s intimidating to speak with elected officials but I don’t find the experience intimidating. The way I look at it, we’re actually their bosses. We elect them to that office. So, when I meet with them I view myself as a concerned constituent and a helpful resource of information for them on the topic of diabetes.

At last week’s event I represented my home state of Minnesota with another passionate advocate who has type 2 diabetes. We also joined forces with South Dakota, so we attended meetings for both states.

Read the rest of my blogpost at On Track Diabetes….

Why We Need to be Talking About Eating Disorders AND Type 1 Diabetes

For 12 years I had suffered in denial, silence, shame, guilt, and despair. I didn’t believe there was another life that I could live. It wasn’t until going to treatment, along with my family and friends support, that I realized there was a wonderful life to live out there. I just needed to be honest with my struggles, accept help and believe that I was worth it.

Read the rest of my blogpost in honor of National Eating Disorder Awareness week here:  https://centerforchange.com/why-we-need-to-be-talking-about-eating-disorders-and-type-1-diabetes/.

My Struggle with Type 1 & Bulimia

I was recently interviewed for a podcast by On Track Diabetes on my personal struggle with type 1 diabetes and bulimia (also referred to as ED-DMT1). Here’s the details…

The Diabetes Dish sat down with Quinn Nystrom to discuss her personal battle with bulimia, how the language around insulin used by a well-meaning doctor when she was first diagnosed may have triggered the problem and the experience of losing a friend to an eating disorder. Quinn’s frank talk will inspire anyone dealing with this challenging issue. 

https://www.ontrackdiabetes.com/podcasts/diabetes-dish/episode-17-quinns-struggle-bulimia

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