The Truth about the Stories we Tell Ourselves

I think Brene Brown said it best “You know what we call a decision with limited data points and little “other” information? A conspiracy.”
We’ve all had negative stories about ourselves that we’ve done a pretty good job of harboring for as long as we can remember. Not just “stories”…but also self-limiting beliefs that keep us stuck and “less than” our true selves. Not only do we give these conspiracies a place to reside, many of us tend to feed, water and nurture them until they become like an unruly weed with roots down to the center of the earth.

To read the full blogpost click here.

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Letting Go Like the Trees

autumn4-2-300x225Fall in our area is a breathtaking event. When the heat of summer fades, and cooler temps take over, it signals the trees that a time of transformation is near. Their normal leafy foliage shifts from bland green to a symphony of blazing oranges, yellows, and reds. But within a few short weeks, the color festival is over as the leaves detach from their branches and drift to the ground.

They let go in such a gentle and beautiful way. And with no regrets.

Spring is often viewed as a time of rejuvenation and a fresh start, but autumn is regarded as the perfect time to wrap up projects and finalize loose ends before the New Year arrives. Many people also use fall as a time to look back and reflect on what hasn’t served them well over the last ten months and use that wisdom to prepare for the next 12 that will be gifted to us after the New Year. Like a tree shedding its leaves, we humans can use this time to “let go” and transform as well. In reality, the trees are showing us a valuable lesson right this very moment.

Autumn shows us how beautiful it is to let things go.

Read the rest of my blogpost for Center for Change here…

https://centerforchange.com/letting-go-like-the-trees/

Be Still

AugustCFCBlogGraphic-261x300Our brains, no matter what age we are, can sometimes be like an over-active toddler. We respond immediately to “shiny objects,” noises, and colorful stimulants so our attention is constantly being shifted from one thing to another.

If you’re five, that is completely normal behavior. If you are an adult trying to hold down a job or even complete tasks at home, these constant distractions make it a challenge to get anything done.

As much as we want our ducks in a row, our lives are often more like squirrels at a rave.

The sad fact is that we allow so much to crowd into our every waking moment, we’ve become immune to the beauty and guidance of subtle nudges, signs, and revelations.

We all need to slow down and just be for a few minutes. Sit outside, sip coffee and just soak up the sun and fresh air. Just hold a quiet space for 15-20 minutes and let our brain rest. Like that rambunctious toddler, we all need to learn to be still.

So what does being still look and feel like? Unlike what the phrase implies being still is not like playing a game of Freeze Tag where everyone goes into statue-mode when a teammate yells “freeze!”

To be still does mean to stop moving, but it also means to start observing. It means taking a break from the headlong rush of a day to just breathe and appreciate.

Here are a handful of ways we can all create some quiet space in our lives…even if it’s only for a few minutes:

Read the full list at Center for Change