Come As You Are

Those who know me well know that I am navigating life with a chronic illness. These same people also know about the side diagnosis that decided to tag along with my type1 diabetes; an eating disorder.

The reality is that eating disorders can affect anyone, anywhere. Eating disorders are not an “it’s all in your head” affliction either — they are complex bio-social illnesses that affect all kinds of people of all ages, genders, ethnicities, or backgrounds.

Including me.

That’s why Monday, February 25 to Sunday, March 3 is such a critically important week for those of us who are fighting the daily battle while working to find our groove when it comes to managing an eating disorder.  The National Eating Disorder Awareness Week (#NEDAwareness) is a seven-day-stretch where all of us can strive to change the conversation around food, body image, and eating disorders by simply being aware, respectful, and informed.

The 2019 National Eating Disorder Awareness Week theme is Come as You Are. I personally love this tagline because I feel like it invites inclusivity and unification within the eating disorder community. Come as You Are also sends a message to individuals of all stages of body acceptance and recovery that their stories are valid and they matter.

Read the rest of the blog here: https://centerforchange.com/come-as-you-are/?fbclid=IwAR3uO4VTTXasuc1yRkWPEDn47Ks1m90S7Qm4QLNcg-1Pb-IeoeQu_GzcCFQ.

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Owning Our Stories

story1“Through stories, we can embrace our past, own who we are today and the people we’re becoming. Right this moment, pause and look at who you’ve become from all the things you’ve made it through. This life is your story. Own it.”
Read my full December blogpost for Center for Change below.
 

Eating Disorders & Type 1 Diabetes

I recently had the pleasure of getting to interview Jenaca Beagley, NP, CDE, and T1D from Center for Change for a podcast episode about the high prevalence of type 1 diabetes and eating disorders (you may have heard this called diabulimia or ED-DMT1). She recently had conducted research that tells us more about this complicated problem that has severe and often irreversible complications if left untreated.The good news is, recognizing and treating the problem properly can make a difference.
Take a listen by clicking below:
 

novemberNovember is a month of so many wonderful holidays and observances including things like Hug a Bear Day, World Kindness Day, Adoption Awareness Month and of course, Thanksgiving.

But the eleventh month is also known to many for one special reason: it’s National Diabetes Awareness Month. If you want the scoop on the backstory of how this national observance came to be, it all started on December 20, 2006, when the United Nations (UN) passed a resolution to designate November 14 as World Diabetes Day.

National Diabetes Awareness Month is the American home-grown version that still shares the same mission of raising awareness about diabetes and its prevention and complications, but advocates of this disease refuse to limit this time of education to one.single.day.

So why is a whole month needed for diabetes awareness? The American Diabetes Association has estimated that 30 million, or 9.4 percent of Americans, have diabetes and an estimated 84 million Americans have prediabetes. But this November observation also works to continue, and amplify the conversation about eating disorders as well.

Read my full blogpost here:

https://centerforchange.com/national-diabetes-awareness-month/?fbclid=IwAR0d4y2z9emPIpMT6lLrNZvGEwBll6YUzWqmvN0c4xyB_9KsRVk7MzyeG-I

Why We Need to be Talking About Eating Disorders AND Type 1 Diabetes

For 12 years I had suffered in denial, silence, shame, guilt, and despair. I didn’t believe there was another life that I could live. It wasn’t until going to treatment, along with my family and friends support, that I realized there was a wonderful life to live out there. I just needed to be honest with my struggles, accept help and believe that I was worth it.

Read the rest of my blogpost in honor of National Eating Disorder Awareness week here:  https://centerforchange.com/why-we-need-to-be-talking-about-eating-disorders-and-type-1-diabetes/.

My Struggle with Type 1 & Bulimia

I was recently interviewed for a podcast by On Track Diabetes on my personal struggle with type 1 diabetes and bulimia (also referred to as ED-DMT1). Here’s the details…

The Diabetes Dish sat down with Quinn Nystrom to discuss her personal battle with bulimia, how the language around insulin used by a well-meaning doctor when she was first diagnosed may have triggered the problem and the experience of losing a friend to an eating disorder. Quinn’s frank talk will inspire anyone dealing with this challenging issue. 

https://www.ontrackdiabetes.com/podcasts/diabetes-dish/episode-17-quinns-struggle-bulimia

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